Kanji Kanban Japanese Sign #255-Lock Your Bicycle

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-bicycle-lock-255

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-256a

 

自転車は必ず

2ロック!

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photos if you need help reading this poster. It’s one of two I noticed that were produced by Kyoto’s Doshisha University to encourage students to protect their bicycles against theft and be more attentive while riding.

I’ll highlight the other poster in the next kanji kanban post.  This one, focused on deterring bicycle thieves, recommends using a u-lock or similar, substantial second lock in addition to the one that many bicycles come equipped with, since those are easily broken.  Typically, bicycles aren’t locked to anything in Japan when they’re parked on the street or in lots, and bicycle theft has become more and more of a problem. It’s often a crime of convenience, because owners get lazy, sometimes neglecting to use even the standard lightweight wheel lock that’s depicted in the upper circle in the poster.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H36, H420, H286, H635)

Kanji In Context(KIC63, KIC65, KIC62, KIC423)

 

 

Originally posted 2013-12-19 00:44:05.

Kanji Kanban Japanese Sign #254-Pig Sculpture

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-pig-254

 

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this character.

Our porcine friend is holding a hyotan, a dried gourd.  ひょうたん like this were traditionally used as sake flasks, and you might well notice one being used as decor if you go to a Japanese restaurant or watering hole.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to its order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H538)

Kanji In Context(KIC1089)

Originally posted 2013-12-09 00:21:39.

Kanji Kanban Japanese Sign #253-Wet Cement

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-253

セメント

ぬりたて

歩かないで

ください

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this. Click on the photo to enlarge it and see the characters more clearly.

My neighbor Mrs. Masuda had some cement poured in front of her house the other day and the workmen put this sign up when they finished.  You can probably guess what it says even if you can’t read the characters.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to its order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H371), Kanji In Context(KIC176)

Originally posted 2013-12-03 00:24:48.