A fast chance for some kanji review!

夜間工事 23時30分〜翌5時30分 車線変更

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary on the text I’ve transcribed just below the photo if you need help reading this sign.

I took this at night in Kyoto in an area where there’s been a lot of road work at night, which involves diverting traffic.

I’d only just learned the reading of  夜間yesterday when I transcribed them in my post about this traffic safety poster, which you might want to check for more reinforcement after reading this post, if you haven’t read it yet.

工事(こうじ)is a common compound meaning construction or road work.

I was happy to see やかん again so soon after writing my last post and to have the chance to test my recall. This sign makes them hard to miss!

I was curious about other common collocations and found 夜間授業(やかんじゅぎょう) in one of  the example sentences given by the Denshi Jisho online Japanese dictionary,  meaning ‘night classes.’

Once my attention was focused on this sign, it gave me some other
useful examples of familiar characters that I’d understood but couldn’t read with confidence.

The character 翌 looked familiar and the context gave me the meaning, ‘the following’ or ‘next.’  The sign abbreviates the compound 翌日(よくじつ), which is the form that I’ve seen this character take in the past.  I also realized that without a clear context like this, I might confuse it with 習おう, to learn.

Thanks to this sign I’ll steer clear of that mistake!

Originally posted 2012-08-12 23:01:54.

Kanji Kanban #273-Fushimi Inari Shrine Torii Gates

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奉納

ペンキぬりたて

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photos if you need help reading the characters on this torii (shrine gate) and the plastic cone.  They were part of the scenery when we paid a visit to Kyoto’s Fushimi Inari Shrine in May.

The two characters on the torii are read from right to left and carry the meaning of an offering, especially in religious contexts.

The thousands of torii that make Fushimi Inari  so unforgettable are vivid examples of such donations, paid for by companies that receive the right to have their names inscribed on the torii in return.

I was struck by how dynamic the atmosphere is, with torii new and old and in between,  some clearly on their last legs.  In stark contrast, the vermilion paint on others was still wet, as the sign on the cone in one photo warns.  The closeup shows another newborn torii, its kanji yet to be painted black.

As we strolled along the path, we looked up and saw a gentleman  perched above us on a ladder. When I asked him how long they usually hold up before succumbing to the elements,  he kindly took a break from his painting duties to report that 10-15 years is a typical torii lifespan. There’s a constant cycle of renewal here, which seems to echo the timeless natural processes at work in the surrounding forest.

What a magical place!

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H1573, H1356)

Kanji In Context(KIC1678, KIC733)

Originally posted 2014-06-21 05:20:01.

Kanji Kanban Japanese Sign #270-Kyoto Subway Lines

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地下鉄に乗る

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading the characters on this poster promoting Kyoto’s subway system.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H515, H50, H846, H1585)

Kanji In Context(KIC146, KIC32, KIC147, KIC135)

Originally posted 2014-04-22 02:19:20.

Kanji Kanban Japanese Sign #269-Kyoto Tanning Salon

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日焼け

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading the characters on this sign.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H12, H1200)

Kanji In Context(KIC16, KIC218)

Originally posted 2014-04-20 01:53:14.

Kanji Kanban Japanese Sign #267- Parking Lot

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時間貸

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading the characters on this parking lot’s sign.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H159, H1620, H1007)

Kanji n Context(KIC25, KIC161, KIC183)

 

Originally posted 2014-04-15 00:23:23.

Kanji Kanban Japanese Sign #266-Kyoto Paper Company

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日本紙

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading these characters.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H12, H211, H1829)

Kanji In Context(KIC16, KIC37, KIC243)

 

Originally posted 2014-04-12 00:38:17.