Kana Kanban

learn_hiragana_1

おまつり

How do you say ‘festival’ in Japanese? If you’re learning hiragana, try reading this poster advertising an upcoming event.  I noticed it on a community message board in my neighborhood in Kyoto.  The お at the beginning is an honorific and is often omitted.

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help.

Kanji Kanban #300

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-300

ブレーキ アクセルの踏み間違いにご注意ください。

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this sign.

Over the years in Kyoto I’ve gotten used to the standard signage in parking lots telling customers that the lot’s full or warning them to lock their car and take valuables with them and to turn off their ignition while they’re parked and refrain from making noise out of consideration for the neighbors.

But this was a first for me. It struck me that someone would go to the trouble of making such a sign and I wondered what prompted them to take action.

Maybe there was an isolated incident in this lot and someone thought it’d be best to post words of caution to prevent another motorist from mistaking the accelerator for the brake.  Or is this sort of thing more common than I think?

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H941, H1022, H1118, H957, H1137, H528, H1035, H548, H474, H1515, H1153, H588, H522, H36, H712, H1525)

Kanji In Context(KIC1059, KIC152, KIC1246, KIC165,KIC238, KIC726, KIC676, KIC673, KIC661, KIC865, KIC402, KIC55, KIC559. KIC63, KIC369, KIC370)