Kana Kanban

learn-hiragana-Japanese-sign-2

そば

If you’re studying  hiragana, try reading the characters written on the side of this restaurant.  If you can read them, you’ll know what traditional dish they specialize in.

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help.

Kanji Kanban #297

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-297

外国たばこ

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this sign.  Read it and you’ll discover what it is that the vending machine next to it sells.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H111, H581)

Kanji In Context(KIC150, KIC151)

Kanji Kanban #296

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-coffee-296

 

コーヒー豆

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this Kyoto shop’s sign.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to its order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H1440)

Kanji In Context(KIC471)

Kanji Kanban #295

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-295

 

なぜ登るのか?

そこに壁ができたから!

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this Kyoto Bouldering Gym’s poster.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H1703, H1500)

Kanji In Context(KIC472, KIC1029)

Kanji Kanban #294

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-coffee-294

 

OK牧場

美味い!!

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this coffee company’s train station billboard.

I couldn’t read the two characters beneath OK on the sign, but after entering them and checking the meaning with rikaichan, I realized that it’s the Japanese translation of the O.K. Corral of gunfight fame.  Though the connection with good coffee isn’t clear to me, I admit! Japanese folks of a certain age are familiar with it thanks to the classic movie from the 50’s.  Can you pronounce this compound?

The second compound must be one of the most often heard words in the Japanese language, especially if you’re fond of watching any of the ubiquitous shows about food here.  But as common as it is, it can be tricky to read if you’re not used to seeing these two characters together, and it can easily be confused with similar words.  Give it a try!

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H329, H545, H548, H219)

Kanji In Context(KIC1273, KIC335, KIC673, KIC311)

Kanji Kanban #293

learn-kanji-Jpanaese-sign-Kyoto-coffee-293

 

当店のコーヒー豆、

ご近所配達いたします。

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this coffee shop’s sign.  It’s a cozy little place and the master takes pride in his beans.  He’ll even deliver them if you live in the neighborhood!

The store across the street is just one of many on this street, called Ebisugawa, that specializes in furnishings.  It’s a tradition that goes back hundreds of years, and has earned this stretch of road the nickname ‘furniture street.’  If you come to Kyoto take a stroll starting from Teramachi and walk west.  It’s one of my favorite streets, with lots to look at and some interesting restaurants, too.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

 

Heisig(H1153, H588, H1440, H1129, H1127, H1436, H552)

Kanji In Context(KIC402, KIC55, KIC471, KIC109, KIC149, KIC727, KIC384)

Kanji Kanban #292

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-peace-292

 

私たちは戦争に協力しません

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this pacifist message.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H902, H1929, H1154, H872, H858)

Kanji In Context(KIC72, KIC360, KIC361, KIC444, KIC173)

Kanji Kanban #291

learn-kanji-Japanese-sign-marriage-291

 

本当に、ありがとう

気持ち、つながる

Use the rikaichan popup dictionary or your favorite reference tool with my transcription below the photo if you need help reading this wedding company’s train station advertisement.

The numbers below refer to the kanji I’ve transcribed below the photo, and correspond to their order of appearance in both Heisig’s Remembering the Kanji and Kanji in Context.

To learn more about how this information can help you learn kanji, please read this.

Heisig(H211, H1153, H1885, H660)

Kanji In Context(KIC37, KIC402, KIC246, KIC142)